Author Topic: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients  (Read 20431 times)

skippy

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2015, 12:24:54 PM »
They finally replied to my old email i sent them;

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One of the major drawbacks of solid silicon implants are bone erosion and long term risk of inflammation and implant rejection, what kind of improvement could we really expect from CT-Bone regarding this?

Inflammation and rejection is always a risk when implanting something. Even when they use the patients own bone, infection or rejection can happen. CT-Bone is a more bone like material, whereas silicon is really a foreign material, so I guess our odds are better.

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How realistic is your early 2016 EU- release? Should we start getting our hopes up just yet?

We are still on schedule for an early 2016 EU-release.

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Would these implants be more surgically challenging to place then ordinary silicon implants? If so, will it be problematic to seek out surgeons capable of installing them?

If anything, it should be easier; we make the implants custom-made, so they should fit perfectly on the bone. Silicon implants are never adopted to the shape of the bone by my knowing. Although I can imagine that because silicon is flexible it can be squeezed through a certain incision, whereas CT-Bone is solid and the incision should be large enough. No squeezing possible. Still I think there is a different purpose: CT-Bone aims to create skeletal symmetry, whereas silicon is used more to achieve soft-tissue symmetry. They will probably co-exist.

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What price bracket will CT-Bone be located in? New technology is always more expensive, how affordable will CT-bone be compared to custom -made solid silicon implants?

I don’t know yet what custom-silicon implants cost. Ballpark figure: I expect facial CT-Bone implants to be between 4.000 and 10.000 €. Is that affordable in your opinion? Maybe I should ask your audience what they would be willing to pay.

terry947

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2015, 11:59:20 PM »
Nice thanks for the reply. I think 10k euro is fine as long as the results are good and not fake looking.

Breakingbad

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2015, 12:56:33 AM »
I think the real question is what those prices mean. I'm betting that's just the price of the implants themselves, before any surgeons get involved.

osteotomy

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2015, 06:56:03 AM »
So, calcium phosphate. What's the difference with hydroxyapatite exactly? The implants are pre-shaped, well yes, but why would they be "replaced by bone" as claimed, whereas that is by far not a given when using for example hydroxyapatite? A lot of claims made by the company selling the stuff, hope they can seriously back it up with some proper studies. Me thinks this would be worldwide front page news if they could.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2015, 08:43:25 AM by osteotomy »

Bobbit

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #34 on: September 15, 2015, 05:34:27 PM »
So, calcium phosphate. What's the difference with hydroxyapatite exactly? The implants are pre-shaped, well yes, but why would they be "replaced by bone" as claimed, whereas that is by far not a given when using for example hydroxyapatite? A lot of claims made by the company selling the stuff, hope they can seriously back it up with some proper studies. Me thinks this would be worldwide front page/Nature.com news if they could.

Osteo:

Your skepticism is well founded.   If you read the details in the literature - -  the matrix is not replaced by real bone.  It does allow some infiltration at the attachment points.


PloskoPlus

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2015, 06:24:25 PM »
Osteo:

Your skepticism is well founded.   If you read the details in the literature - -  the matrix is not replaced by real bone.  It does allow some infiltration at the attachment points.
So does HA paste.

Bobbit

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2015, 08:20:28 PM »
So does HA paste.

Yes... agree.  There is supposed to be infiltration at the mating surface.

Lazlo

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #37 on: September 15, 2015, 09:46:10 PM »
newsflash medpor allows extensive blood vessel ingrowth and it stays fucking medpor.


PloskoPlus

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #38 on: September 15, 2015, 10:18:43 PM »
newsflash medpor allows extensive blood vessel ingrowth and it stays fucking medpor.
Quoted for truth.

overbiter

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #39 on: September 16, 2015, 01:48:26 PM »
Osteo:

Your skepticism is well founded.   If you read the details in the literature - -  the matrix is not replaced by real bone.  It does allow some infiltration at the attachment points.

I'm not sure what source material you are reading, but if you did a bit more background research you would realise you are wrong. Here is an article about the company that makes CT-Bone, Next 21

http://3dprint.com/37745/bone-and-tissue-bioprinting/

In the article the lead researcher specifically states that this technique is useful to treat children born with deformities. Why would anyone Implant a material that fuses with a childs bone (and therefore cannot be removed) but does not remould as a child grows. Think about it, don't be ignorant.

"Takato is the head of the Division of Tissue Engineering at Tokyo University Hospital and says he believes this technology will also offer hope to children born with bone or cartilage deformities. He says the process of using synthetic implants is currently inadequate as the rate of a child’s growth outstrips the usefulness of the implants over time."


Bobbit

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #40 on: September 16, 2015, 04:02:50 PM »
I'm not sure what source material you are reading, but if you did a bit more background research you would realise you are wrong. Here is an article about the company that makes CT-Bone, Next 21

http://3dprint.com/37745/bone-and-tissue-bioprinting/

In the article the lead researcher specifically states that this technique is useful to treat children born with deformities. Why would anyone Implant a material that fuses with a childs bone (and therefore cannot be removed) but does not remould as a child grows. Think about it, don't be ignorant.

"Takato is the head of the Division of Tissue Engineering at Tokyo University Hospital and says he believes this technology will also offer hope to children born with bone or cartilage deformities. He says the process of using synthetic implants is currently inadequate as the rate of a child’s growth outstrips the usefulness of the implants over time."

What is proposed in the article you point to is, as yet,  just a  possible/maybe still to be approved project - -  which appears to be an interesting further possible advance on the CT Bone Next 21 calcium phosphate process.

But the discussion was about the existing Next 21 calcium phosphate implants - -   not some further possible / maybe / sometime development.  I think it remains true that the calcium phosphate implants allow infiltration at the attachment surfaces - -  but do not grow native bone in the matrix.

But new research may enhance that sometime further down the road with the different biological components (such as stem cells) that are planned to be added to the  3D printing process - - sometime in the future.


overbiter

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #41 on: September 16, 2015, 05:29:05 PM »
What is proposed in the article you point to is, as yet,  just a  possible/maybe still to be approved project - -  which appears to be an interesting further possible advance on the CT Bone Next 21 calcium phosphate process.

But the discussion was about the existing Next 21 calcium phosphate implants - -   not some further possible / maybe / sometime development.  I think it remains true that the calcium phosphate implants allow infiltration at the attachment surfaces - -  but do not grow native bone in the matrix.

But new research may enhance that sometime further down the road with the different biological components (such as stem cells) that are planned to be added to the  3D printing process - - sometime in the future.

Where are you getting your facts from buddy? Just point me to the literature that is backing up your claims and I will believe you. You stated that somewhere in the small print it said that CT-Bone is non resorbable. Just show me where it says that and set me straight. I want to see it, if it is true. If that claim of yours was made up on the other hand, then back down gracefully, and don't make shit up in the future.

PloskoPlus

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #42 on: September 16, 2015, 06:04:01 PM »
Ha paste is widely used for paediatric craniofacial defects.

Bobbit

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #43 on: September 16, 2015, 07:48:42 PM »
Where are you getting your facts from buddy? Just point me to the literature that is backing up your claims and I will believe you. You stated that somewhere in the small print it said that CT-Bone is non resorbable. Just show me where it says that and set me straight. I want to see it, if it is true. If that claim of yours was made up on the other hand, then back down gracefully, and don't make shit up in the future.

Overbiter,

Your response is pretty hostile in tone.  Is that really necessary ?

The problem I have, is what I see in the following:

"The manufacturing of CT-Bone involves printing the designed implant using calcium phosphate, the primary constituent of natural bone. The advantage is that when this is implanted, the patient’s existing bone fuses with it just as it would with natural bone and unifies in a few months. It’s a bone-like implant that allows bone to grow naturally into it.

As Maikel Beerens, CEO at Xilloc, said, “3D Printing of CT-Bone allows us to help even more patients with a tailor-made solution. After taking a CT-scan of the patient, a patient-specific implant is designed by our biomedical engineers in collaboration with the surgeon. This design perfectly fits on the anatomy of the patient, ensuring good bone-to-implant contact and facilitating bony in-growth.”  "

That is NOT a direct claim that the calcium phosphate is absorbed.   It is not a direct claim that the calcium phosphate is replaced by new bone growth. 

The best that can be said is that the CT-bone fits well to the mating surface (due to the digital 3D printing - - not the material ) and that facilitates intimate contact with the bone and that facilitates bony "in-growht".   

Nor is that a claim that the calcium phosphate is replaced with natural bone. 

Is it possible that at some point that we could have a complete bony infiltration that over time functions like real bone: Meaning that there will be an integral blood supply through a new periosteum layer and there will be internal bone marrow which is making new blood cells and which new bone could repair itself if fractured like natural bone repairs itself ?   Yes.   I suppose all of that is possible. 

But at this point,  that is still a long way in the future.   

All of that is my opinion, based on my reading of the literature and the basic biology involved. 

Regards

Lazlo

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Re: 3D Printed Bone Implants Are Now Available For Patients
« Reply #44 on: September 16, 2015, 09:49:43 PM »
Yeah Bobbit is right.