Author Topic: BIMAX complications  (Read 164 times)

startalk

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
BIMAX complications
« on: September 30, 2017, 02:10:53 PM »
I was told by Maxillofacial surgeon  that I need bimax for my underbite.I searched on the internet for some informations about surgery and holy sh*t it looks dangerous as hell.What are some complications regarding this surgery? And,this may sound stupid,but is death possible outcome of this surgery?

tdawg

  • Private
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 161
  • Karma: 19
Re: BIMAX complications
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2017, 02:24:02 PM »
Death is always a possible outcome of any surgery(well any activity pretty much). The chances are very very very low however. I have had bimax surgery myself recently and I can say confidently not to worry about dying as long as you are being operated on by a board certified surgeon in a legitimate hospital. What you need to worry about are 2 things
1)Nerve damage/numbness
2)Bad results

If you are a non super complicated underbite case you are probably going to have great results. Even still I would make sure my surgeon has a good reputation and does a decent amount of jaw surgeries. Also ask him to show him cases similar to yours.

As for nerve damage/numbness this is something that seems to be luck of the draw. What I am referring to is sensation loss btw, usually over a small area around the chin or lower lip. The older you are the higher the chance of having permanent numbness somewhere. If you are under 30 you have a decent shot at regaining all feeling within a year. I am currently 2 months post op and I have all sensation and motor function except for a small patch around my left lower lip. Even that isnt actually numb(I can feel it and distinguish between soft and sharp) just "altered" as in it doesnt feel normal.

startalk

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
Re: BIMAX complications
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2017, 05:19:46 PM »
Death is always a possible outcome of any surgery(well any activity pretty much). The chances are very very very low however. I have had bimax surgery myself recently and I can say confidently not to worry about dying as long as you are being operated on by a board certified surgeon in a legitimate hospital. What you need to worry about are 2 things
1)Nerve damage/numbness
2)Bad results

If you are a non super complicated underbite case you are probably going to have great results. Even still I would make sure my surgeon has a good reputation and does a decent amount of jaw surgeries. Also ask him to show him cases similar to yours.

As for nerve damage/numbness this is something that seems to be luck of the draw. What I am referring to is sensation loss btw, usually over a small area around the chin or lower lip. The older you are the higher the chance of having permanent numbness somewhere. If you are under 30 you have a decent shot at regaining all feeling within a year. I am currently 2 months post op and I have all sensation and motor function except for a small patch around my left lower lip. Even that isnt actually numb(I can feel it and distinguish between soft and sharp) just "altered" as in it doesnt feel normal.


Thanks a lot for response!

I am thinking of doing surgery with dr.Gunson.Also,most people say that first week is hell.Is it because of pain or general discomfort?

tdawg

  • Private
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 161
  • Karma: 19
Re: BIMAX complications
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 05:45:42 PM »
Its hard to find a surgeon with a better rep than Gunson so you are good on that front. My experience was that physically this surgery isnt all that its hyped up to be. My energy levels were back to normal within a few days(but im used to getting shitty sleep which you will the first couple of days) and I had very little actual pain to the point that I only ever had to use the ibuprofen(liquid advil) and never used the codeine that was prescribed. Even the ibuprofen I mostly took because it helps with the swelling. Your face will feel awful though, it just might not be very painful. There was a lot of stiffness and pressure. That didnt bother me though. What did was the fact that I was very congested and the blood that was causing that congestion was literally the worst thing that I have ever smelt in my life. I dont know if I had a brief/mild infection but I never want to smell that smell again. I didnt have instructions about not blowing my nose or anything(if you use Gunson you probably will) so I went to town with q-tips and tweezers to declog my nose and after about a week it wasnt a problem any more. They also give you decongestants to help.  In addition the area under my nose would get itchy a lot but was totally numb and scratching didnt help. Obviously the diet sucks. Overall the first week is not great but I wouldnt classify it as hell physically speaking.

Now for me it was(and still is in some ways) awful mentally. I was very afraid of somehow compromising the fixation. Every little change I noticed or maybe a step up the stairs that I felt in my jaw, or a yawn with the elastics in, I was afraid of compromising the fixation. It didnt help that some of the brackets broke during the surgery without anybody telling me, so the teeth started to shift and without knowing that the brackets were broken I assumed I somehow shifted things out of place. I was convinced I was going to have to do revision until my first post op appointment a week later. Also after about a week you start to analyze your results and by 3 weeks a lot of the swelling is gone so you think you are seeing close to your final results but enough is still there to distort things. The worst for me though is that I feel like I am now just about 100% speech wise whereas I had to return to school a month ago.

In the end recovery is going to vary from person to person. I think if you go with Gunson you will have a different experience. I have read that sometimes his patients take a little bit more of a hit physically because he uses HA paste a lot and tends to do big movements. That being said mentally you have the peace of mind of knowing you are in the care of a rockstar and are probably going to come out the other side with the best results realistically possible. And I hear he is somewhat strict with the post-op routine which may seem like a hassle but helps mentally imo.