Author Topic: Stanford lecture on the State of the Art in Jaw Surgery  (Read 318 times)

kavan

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Re: Stanford lecture on the State of the Art in Jaw Surgery
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2018, 06:44:27 AM »
One of the key movers and shakers in tissue engineering, which I recognize from the bibliography of that article, is Dr. Vacanti. He is listed in the references in that article. He's made scaffolds, seeded them with liver producing cells and has made a liver. Some time ago, I used to attend his lectures at MGH.

As to the article, it isn't entirely the 'science' of tissue engineering that's too 'basic'. A lot is a matter of bureaucratic, regulatory, financing, acceptance etc. hurdles  that impede it's progress and incorporation into mainstream medicine.

As to Epi-Bone, if you look at the team, although they have some studies under belt in tissue engineering, for the most part they are just young entrepreneurs.
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Lazlo

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Re: Stanford lecture on the State of the Art in Jaw Surgery
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2018, 03:08:20 PM »
One of the key movers and shakers in tissue engineering, which I recognize from the bibliography of that article, is Dr. Vacanti. He is listed in the references in that article. He's made scaffolds, seeded them with liver producing cells and has made a liver. Some time ago, I used to attend his lectures at MGH.

As to the article, it isn't entirely the 'science' of tissue engineering that's too 'basic'. A lot is a matter of bureaucratic, regulatory, financing, acceptance etc. hurdles  that impede it's progress and incorporation into mainstream medicine.

As to Epi-Bone, if you look at the team, although they have some studies under belt in tissue engineering, for the most part they are just young entrepreneurs.

You know your shit Kavan. From your scientific estimation, does Epi-bone have a product in the pipeline within the next 3-5 years or are they just making shit up?

PloskoPlus

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Re: Stanford lecture on the State of the Art in Jaw Surgery
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2018, 05:00:26 PM »
Most progress is during massive wars - putting the injured back in action in some sort of capacity as quickly as possible, or having lots of maimed vets to experiment on afterwards. Antibiotics, distraction osteogenesis came out of ww2.

kavan

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Re: Stanford lecture on the State of the Art in Jaw Surgery
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2018, 01:26:22 PM »
You know your shit Kavan. From your scientific estimation, does Epi-bone have a product in the pipeline within the next 3-5 years or are they just making shit up?

Well, it just looks like what they (others) are already doing with STEM CELLS. You know, taking FAT and getting the stem cells out of it and seeding them onto to a scaffold and getting them to turn into the body part you want.

IDK, on their PRESS page, most of the press is their own fucking Twitter feeds. They just seem to be a start up company looking for VENTURE CAPITAL.

I can tell you that what they are doing CAN be done. You know, get a CT scan of a shape of a bone defect, get a scaffold on which to populate the stem cells extracted from fat. But then again from the same CT scan of a bone defect shape, a 3D 'fix it' shape can also be made from another bio compatible material via 3 d printing. So, a 3D print out from a CT scan for a construct from a bio-compatible material is going to be much faster to kick up than for those stem cells to develop into bone on the scaffold.

There is also a level of, how do I say...'immaturity' about them where they are making jewelry out of the process like some ugly earings and silly smart phone cover. OK. FINE. They are trying to fuse 'art with science'.

The illustration they have is a skull with a HOLE in it's head. LOL, WTF...they are looking for cases where someone has a hole in their head to be filled with bone?

Are you interested in INVESTING in them? The bio tech firms that get the investments are the ones close to MIT and MGH where they got all the staff doing the stuff right there.
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Lefortitude

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Re: Stanford lecture on the State of the Art in Jaw Surgery
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2018, 07:03:19 AM »
In vivo bioreaction has proven it works.  Not sure why nobodys started a company to develope it for cosmetic uses.  that would be a CASHCOW.  maybe il start one up...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_vivo_bioreactor

If youre pessimistic, you gotta realize how small the field of maxfac surgery is compared to something like orthopedic surgery.  in addition, 30 years is nothing in medical terms of technological and sociological advancements.  were moving at an exponential rate.  hopefully the next generation has it better than we do.