Author Topic: Facelift Dentistry?  (Read 488 times)

fulcanelli

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2018, 11:02:21 AM »
I get that. My point is that if you get this done how would the lower jaw look when resting, talking when the upper and lower teeth are not meeting? They kinda imply that the jaw realignment is permanent but I don’t see it can be if the teeth aren’t closed to support everything. Maybe the muscles readjust to this new position? Seems a bit unlikely though.

kavan

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2018, 11:21:19 AM »
I get that. My point is that if you get this done how would the lower jaw look when resting, talking when the upper and lower teeth are not meeting? They kinda imply that the jaw realignment is permanent but I don’t see it can be if the teeth aren’t closed to support everything. Maybe the muscles readjust to this new position? Seems a bit unlikely though.

Same way it would look if you didn't get the teeth elongated.
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fulcanelli

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2018, 11:25:17 AM »
 Yeh that’s what I think too. So it’s not really an alternative to jaw surgery as claimed. Well maybe if you want to walk around with your mouth shut all the time..

kavan

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2018, 11:55:18 AM »
Yeh that’s what I think too. So it’s not really an alternative to jaw surgery as claimed. Well maybe if you want to walk around with your mouth shut all the time..

Ya. That's basically it.

Let's say, someone has a deep bite and a retrusive mandible and they learn to hide that by dropping their jaw down and out at rest where they get the FRONT lower teeth to meet the FRONT upper teeth where they should be. If they look to see what's going on when they do that, they will find that it basically yields a massive posterior OPEN BITE.  So, solution would be to ELONGATE the MOLARS so the person doesn't go back into the deep bite when chewing or when getting their back molars to meet in repose. Voila! That's part of the guy's 'secret' as to 'correcting the bite' so the person looks better WHEN they are occluding with their back molars.

His closed mouth before photos show people occluding the back molars and their lower '1/3rds' looking kind of 'short' and or retrusive due to that. So when the back molars are ELONGATED, the closed mouth position no longer yields the retrusive or short look.
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fulcanelli

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2018, 03:05:34 AM »
They have responded:

“As far as the jaw goes, everyone is different and we know nothing about you or your structures, bite, jaw position or jaw sizes.  Most of the time your jaw is not "brought forward" because it usually does this naturally.  Right now if you have an overbite, you jaw is forced backwards.”

I am sceptical on the overbite forces the jaw backwards point. Thoughts on this?

But it got me thinking maybe my lower jaw is short due to posterior open bite and front over bite but not actually recessed. How can I check? I’ve tried jutting lower jaw forward and also letting it hang down trying not to let it come forward and there isn’t that much difference, both are an improvement. Probably not an accurate indicator I know.

kavan

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2018, 07:07:50 AM »
They have responded:

“As far as the jaw goes, everyone is different and we know nothing about you or your structures, bite, jaw position or jaw sizes.  Most of the time your jaw is not "brought forward" because it usually does this naturally.  Right now if you have an overbite, you jaw is forced backwards.”

I am sceptical on the overbite forces the jaw backwards point. Thoughts on this?

But it got me thinking maybe my lower jaw is short due to posterior open bite and front over bite but not actually recessed. How can I check? I’ve tried jutting lower jaw forward and also letting it hang down trying not to let it come forward and there isn’t that much difference, both are an improvement. Probably not an accurate indicator I know.

Your jaw is brought backwards with an overbite. That is true.

But the jaw can easily be brought forwards with concious effort to mask it's backwards orientation from the overbite. So what they can do is elongate the back molars so they touch in the position where one is bringing their jaw forwards to mask the retrusion the overbite gives them.
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sooq

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2018, 07:16:49 AM »
I saw this guy when I was in CA to see Arnett in 2016. I was sceptical too but thought I may as well see him whilst I was doing the rounds of a few CA surgeons.

I can't remember exactly, without digging out the paperwork, but I think the cost was around 100k US. So irrespective of anything else, that was me out!

I didn't come out with a better understanding of the process than anything that has been posted here - all I even remember was just that he emphasised that they do not grind down teeth like with veneers. Other than that I am still in the dark as to what the hell he does. I very much got the impression that everything he was saying was just regurgitation of sales patter he says to every patient. He was friendly and warm, I just didn't feel comfortable with any of it, considering this was my entire mouth of teeth and a cost that was astronomical. Plus, the teeth in his after photos do look pretty fake and plasticky. It would look ridiculous on my face.

Even if you ignore the above and could afford it, I think there is a limitation as to what it can achieve and who it can help anyway. Just imagine spending this amount of money and then realising after that it hasn't really been a substitute for jaw surgery. I think the truth is there is no real alternative to jaw surgery. If you need it you need it. You can of course choose not to have it and live with your face, thereby avoiding the risks that surgery entails. But IMO you aren't ever going to be satisfied with masking procedures if you have true boney issues and imbalances.

fulcanelli

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Re: Facelift Dentistry?
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2018, 11:19:17 AM »
100k is insane I can’t believe anyone would pay that. I have a suspicion  they’re vague about their methods because essentially it’s build up the back teeth and stick veneers on the front. Obviously it takes a good dr to get the bite in the right place and look good but I can’t see why it costs that much.

I think you’re right it can never replace surgery if you really need it but for borderline cases or people who want to improve aesthetics I can see the benefit over years in braces, surgery and even then a unpredictable outcome. If it was cheaper and other dentists start offering similar services without the facelift schtick I’d probably do it.